Wed, 29th May 2024 06:45 (GMT +7)

Dossier seeking UNESCO title for heritage clusters replied

Thursday, 11/04/2024 | 09:54:02 [GMT +7] A  A

UNESCO has responded to the scientific dossier seeking its recognition for the Complex of Yen Tu – Vinh Nghiem – Con Son, Kiep Bac Monuments and Landscapes as a world heritage site, according to the Cultural Heritage Department under the Ministry of Culture, Sports and Tourism.

Dong pagoda in the Yen Tu historical relic (Photo: VietnamPlus)

UNESCO said the dossier meets all technical requirements outlined in the World Heritage Convention, the department said.

The dossier comprises 2,139 pages of original Vietnamese and their English translations, along with 101 diagrams and maps, 196 architectural drawings, 260 archaeological drawings, and 1,141 photographs, representing the historical, cultural, architectural, intangible, and tangible heritage values; and an overall management plan across the three northern provinces of Quang Ninh, Hai Duong, and Bac Giang.

This is the first heritage dossier in Vietnam within the series of 18 heritage clusters, featuring 32 inter-provincial relic sites with a vast area and complex mountainous terrain.

The complex cover of four clusters of special national historical relics: the Yen Tu historical relic and landscape area (Uong Bi city of Quang Ninh), the Tran Dynasty historical relic area (Dong Trieu township of Quang Ninh), the Tay (Western) Yen Tu relic and landscape area (Bac Giang), and the Con Son - Kiep Bac complex (Hai Duong).

A large number of relics and landscapes in the Yen Tu-Vinh Nghiem-Con Son Kiep Bac complex have been recognised as provincial or national heritage sites which boast a harmonious combination of natural landscapes and architectural structures with special values.

Besides, the complex holds great historical significance as it is the birthplace of Truc Lam - the Vietnamese Zen Buddhism founded by King-Monk Tran Nhan Tong (1258 - 1308). It was also associated with the formation and development of the Tran Dynasty (1225 - 1400).

Source: Nhan Dan